Citati iz knjige „Introducing Feminism“ autora Cathia Jenainati

MAN IS THE HEAD OF THE HOUSEHOLD ...
... JUST AS THE MONARCH IS THE HEAD OF STATE AND JESUS HEAD OF THE CHURCH.
Two essays, one on “The Enfranchisement of Women” (1851), the other “On the Subjection of Women” (1869), illustrate their commitment to write about sexual discrimination from an informed perspective. The fact that they agree on principles and disagree on the solutions further testifies to their personal engagement with these issues.

Taylor is thought to be the primary author of the essay on the enfranchisement of women.
Harriet Taylor Mill (1807–58) and John Stuart Mill (1806–73) are two key figures who endorsed Wollstonecraft’s liberal feminist ideas and expanded on them in the second half of the 19th century. They too led an unconventional private life.
WHAT I WRITE, IS WRITTEN IN NO SPIRIT OF REBELLION; IT PUTS FORWARD NO ABSURD CLAIM OF EQUALITY; IT IS SIMPLY AN APPEAL FOR PROTECTION.

“Our mercantile and uncertain speculation of ‘damages’, – the wonderful indecency of our diverce trials, – the incredible fact that the woman accused is allowed no direct defence, and cannot appear by counsel on such occasions, – the loth and reluctant admission of the right of a mother to her inhant children, – are alike odious and incomprehensible.”

Caroline Norton’s triumphs paved the way for more substantial reforms in the late 19th century. But the law remained mostly on the fathers’ side, retaining the principles of inequality between women and men.
ALTHOUGH WE WERE TRAVELLING WITH OUR HUSBANDS WHO WERE DELEGATES, WE WERE NOT ALLOWED TO PARTICIPATE IN THE CONFERENCE AND WERE FORCED TO SIT BEHIND A CURTAIN WHICH SEPARATED US FROM MALE AUDIENCE MEMBERS AND MALE SPEAKERS.

When they returned to New York, they decided to organize a convention to which they invited women suffragists and interested men. The aim was to discuss issues related to equality in education, marriage and property laws.

This was the text of the invitation:

Woman’s Rights Convention. – A Convention to discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and rights of woman, will be held in the Wesleyan Chapel, at Seneca Falls, N. Y., on Wednesday and Thursday, the 19th and 20th of July, current; commencing at 10 o’clock am. During the first day the meeting will be exclusively for women, who are earnestly invited to attend. The public generally are invited to be present on the second day, when Lucretia Mott, of Philadelphia, and other ladies and gentlemen, will address the convention.
Although she had been against marriage by principle, Barbara decided to marry Eugene Bodichon, a former French army officer who held radical political views and supported her efforts for achieving women’s rights.
Like Martineau, she wrote extensively in favour of women doctors and opportunities for women in higher education. She campaigned with Caroline Norton for changing legislation with regard to divorce and the protection of property rights of divorced women.
The 1850s witnessed a resurgence of feminist activism in Britain, where a series of important legislations were introduced as a result of high-profile legal battles and in response to the growing number of single middle-class women who campaigned for economic independence. Among the key figures of this period were Harriet Martineau (1802–76) and Barbara Leigh Smith Bodichon (1827–91).

Harriet Martineau was born to Unitarian parents who held progressive views on girls’ education.
Social reformists in England and the US attempted to make their voices heard by staging numerous public lectures, founding societies and writing extensively about the “woman question”. Most notably, the Anglo-American author Frances Wright, founder of the Nashoba commune, toured the US from 1818 to 1820 and reported her impressions in Views of Society and Manners in America (1821).
many suffragettes who feared that focus on dress reform, though necessary, could detract attention from more serious women’s rights issues
Writing on women’s issues in the late 16th century began to proliferate, with a number of essays challenging the ideal of the female as “chaste, silent and obedient”. In 1589, Jane Anger’sHer Protection for Women reinterpreted Genesis.
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