Citati iz knjige „Beyond Good and Evil“ autora Friedrich Nietzsche

He who fights with monsters should be careful lest he thereby become a monster. And if thou gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will also gaze into thee.
Insanity in individuals is something rare—but in groups, parties, nations, and epochs it is the rule.
He who fights with monsters should be careful lest he thereby become a monster. And if thou gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will also gaze into thee.
Dreadful experiences raise the question whether he who experiences them is not something dreadful also.
Sup­pos­ing that Truth is a wo­man—what then? Is there not ground for sus­pect­ing that all philo­soph­ers, in so far as they have been dog­mat­ists, have failed to un­der­stand wo­men—that the ter­rible ser­i­ous­ness and clumsy im­por­tun­ity with which they have usu­ally paid their ad­dresses to Truth, have been un­skilled and un­seemly meth­ods for win­ning a wo­man? Cer­tainly she has never al­lowed her­self to be won; and at present every kind of dogma stands with sad and dis­cour­aged mien—if, in­deed, it stands at all!
f this Will—un­til at last we came to an ab­so­lute stand­still be­fore a yet more fun­da­mental ques­tion. We in­quired about the value of this Will. Gran­ted that we want the truth: why not rather un­truth? And un­cer­tainty? Even ig­nor­ance? The prob­lem of the value of truth presen­ted it­self be­fore us—or was it we who presen­ted ourselves be­fore the prob­lem? Which of us is the Oedipus here? Which
The fun­da­mental be­lief of meta­phys­i­cians is the be­lief in an­ti­thesis of
in­ter­rog­a­tion

опрос

ren­dez­vous

свидание

per­plex­ing

озадачивающий

sur­moun­ted

увенчана

su­per­sti­tion

суеверие

But rather in the lap of Be­ing, in the in­trans­it­ory, in the con­cealed God, in the ‘Th­ing-in-it­self’—there must be their source, and nowhere else!
in this trans­it­ory, se­duct­ive, il­lus­ory, paltry world, in this tur­moil of de­lu­sion and cu­pid­ity, they can­not have their source.
We in­quired about the value of this Will.
frog per­spect­ives,” as it were, to bor­row an
su­per­flu­ous tele­olo­gical prin­ciples!—
He who fights with mon­sters should be care­ful lest he thereby be­come a mon­ster. And if thou gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will also gaze into thee.
A man who says: “I like that, I take it for my own, and mean to guard and pro­tect it from every­one”; a man who can con­duct a case, carry out a res­ol­u­tion, re­main true to an opin­ion, keep hold of a wo­man, pun­ish and over­throw in­solence; a man who has his in­dig­na­tion and his sword, and to whom the weak, the suf­fer­ing, the op­pressed, and even the an­im­als will­ingly sub­mit and nat­ur­ally be­long; in short, a man who is a mas­ter by nature—when such a man has sym­pathy, well! that sym­pathy has value
One finds nowadays among artists and schol­ars plenty of those who be­tray by their works that a pro­found long­ing for noble­ness im­pels them; but this very need of noble­ness is rad­ic­ally dif­fer­ent from the needs of the noble soul it­self, and is in fact the elo­quent and dan­ger­ous sign of the lack thereof
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