Romancing Mister Bridgerton, Julia Quinn
en
Knjige
Julia Quinn

Romancing Mister Bridgerton

Nadine Davidson
Nadine Davidsonje citiralaпре 5 година
Prologue

On the sixth of April, in the year 1812—precisely two days before her sixteenth birthday—Penelope Featherington fell in love.

It was, in a word, thrilling. The world shook. Her heart leaped. The moment was breathtaking. And, she was able to tell herself with some satisfaction, the man in question—one Colin Bridgerton—felt precisely the same way.

Oh, not the love part. He certainly didn’t fall in love with her in 1812 (and not in 1813, 1814, 1815, or—oh, blast, not in all the years 1816–1822, either, and certainly not in 1823, when he was out of the country the whole time, anyway). But his earth shook, his heart leaped, and Penelope knew without a shadow of a doubt that his breath was taken away as well. For a good ten seconds.

Falling off a horse tended to do that to a man.

It happened thus:

She’d been out for a walk in Hyde Park with her mother and two older sisters when she felt a thunderous rumbling under her feet (see above: the bit about the earth shaking). Her mother wasn’t paying much attention to her (her mother rarely did), so Penelope slipped away for a moment to see what was about. The rest of the Featheringtons were in rapt conversation with Viscountess Bridgerton and her daughter Daphne, who had just begun her second season in London, so they were pretending to ignore the rumbling. The Bridgertons were an important family indeed, and conversations with them were not to be ignored.

As Penelope skirted around the edge of a particularly fattrunked tree, she saw two riders coming her way, galloping along hell-for-leather or whatever expression people liked to use for fools on horseback who care not for their safety and well-being. Penelope felt her heart quicken (it would have been difficult to maintain a sedate pulse as a witness to such excitement, and besides, this allowed her to say that her heart leaped when she fell in love).

Then, in one of those inexplicable quirks of fate, the wind picked up quite suddenly and lifted her bonnet (which, much to her mother’s chagrin, she had not tied properly since the ribbon chafed under her chin) straight into the air and, splat! right onto the face of one of the riders.
Ify
Ifyje citiralaпрошлог месеца
But contentment wasn’t the same thing as happiness
Eduarda Lopes
Eduarda Lopesje citiraoпрошлог месеца
“We women must look out for one another,” Lady Danbury said to no one in particular, “since it is clear that no one else will do so.”
Eduarda Lopes
Eduarda Lopesje citiraoпрошлог месеца
Deep inside, she knew who she was, and that person was smart and kind and often even funny, but somehow her personality always got lost somewhere between her heart and her mouth, and she found herself saying the wrong thing or, more often, nothing at all.
iechan
iechanje citiraoпре 2 месеца
She looked down to discover that a large yellowish blob of pastry cream had slid from her half-eaten éclair and landed on the pristine wooden floor.
Marie Bataillard
Marie Bataillardje citiraoпре 7 месеци
Hyacinth said breezily, “but there’s something rather enjoyable about the word glue. Slides off the tongue rather pleasingly, don’t you think? Glue. Glooooooo.”
Marie Bataillard
Marie Bataillardje citiraoпре 7 месеци
People are like fine wines. If they start off good, they only get better with age.”
Marie Bataillard
Marie Bataillardje citiraoпре 7 месеци
“Isn’t it nice,” the older lady said, leaning in so that only Penelope could hear her words, “to discover that we’re not exactly what we thought we were?”
Marie Bataillard
Marie Bataillardje citiraoпре 7 месеци
“How many great mysteries are there in life, really?”
Marie Bataillard
Marie Bataillardje citiraoпре 7 месеци
“I like her,” Lady D said to him, pointing at Penelope as if she were some sort of statue for sale. “Did I tell you I like her?”
Marie Bataillard
Marie Bataillardje citiraoпре 7 месеци
“Tenacious to the end.”

“Tenacity can be a very good thing,” Eloise reminded her, “at the proper time.”

“Right,” Penelope returned with a sarcastic smile, “and at the improper time, it’s an absolute nightmare.”
Marie Bataillard
Marie Bataillardje citiraoпре 7 месеци
The door had never looked so good.
Marie Bataillard
Marie Bataillardje citiraoпре 7 месеци
“Tenacious to the end.”

“Tenacity can be a very good thing,”
Sara Yassin
Sara Yassinje citiralaпрошле године
LADY WHISTLEDOWN’S SOCIETY PAPERS, 12 APRIL 1824
Anastasiya Soleil
Anastasiya Soleilje citiralaпрошле године
without a shadow of a doubt
Stefura Stefania
Stefura Stefaniaje citiralaпрошле године
“I’m fine,” she assured him, but she sat down, anyway.
tomyrisd
tomyrisdje citiraoпре 4 године
When people were convinced they had problems, the last thing they wanted to hear was a simple, straightforward solution.
Shalini Selvarajan
Shalini Selvarajanje citiralaпре 4 године
This was Penelope, and this was love
fb2epub
Prevucite i otpustite datoteke (ne više od 5 odjednom)